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Posts tagged ‘Perpetual Motion practice’

Fascia & Baby Dancemeditation

I received two wonderful notes from Dancemeditation teacher/practitioners:

First from Teresa Dunyati-Long, CDMT, and neruoscience PhD candidate, about moving with fascial awareness:
“I think you have got a dead eye bead on this! And its not only
the conditioning of the skeleto-muscular systems that is enhanced, but
also functioning of the entire nervous system. That is really the
thrust of my research — the somatic component of cognition, which
depends on the integrity of the cells that give rise to cognition.
It is so miraculous, Dunya! During Dancemeditation to an African-style
marimba band, I was able to see the links in the chain from the first
stirrings of matter out of a sea of golden and silver energy, how they
self-organize due to the interaction between the Void and the Energy
such that everything manifest occurs. It was a heady vision — I was doing Perpetual Motion fascia to the music. Massively powerful whole-brain vision induction technique combination.
Artists always get there first, Dunya, did you know that? I can show
you strong evidence even scientists would have to agree with….hence,
all our dance artists got to the right combination of techniques to
sustain mind and body in creative adaptability. You are definitely one
of the pioneers in this field.”

And this from Stephanie Rudloe, CDMT, about Dancemeditation practice with her new baby, Priscilla.
“The baby was quite remarkable yesterday; she joined me in
Dancemeditation practice. I sat her on the floor in front of me & she did the first moves of the Opening Sequence – forward bend. Doing her own movement – mostly sitting up & with her own little shimmy rocking hand movement. Then it moved into some baby form of contact improv & then we both did our own thing rolling around on the carpet. She made it half way thru ‘Sufi Traveler’ (20 minutes) before wanting to nurse. Who would have thought Dancemeditation for babies?!”

Perpetual Motion

Practice: Perpetual Motion
Use any music that has a steady rhythm (different tempi are fine) without silences at a sustainable pace.
Keep moving as much of the entire body as possible for a minimum of 20 minutes. 40 minutes is best.

Though I generally begin with a sense of obligatory gloom, Perpetual Motion practice invariably morphs into fun once endorphins kick in. Read more